Category: Vegetables

Cover Crops for Home Gardeners
Cover Crops for Home Gardeners

Thanks to Chris Benedict at WSU Whatcom Extension and his reminder to plan for cover crops in the recent edition of Whatcom Ag Monthly.  This time of year, farmers face decisions on which cover crops to plant for fall. Cover crops are frequently used to improve and protect the soil. Home gardeners should consider using […]

Summer Cover Crops
Summer Cover Crops

Most folks know that winter cover crops like rye and vetch can be a huge benefit to their soils. Winter cover crops benefit their crops by providing soil cover to prevent erosion, keep valuable nutrients cycling through the microbiome below the soil surface, suppress weeds, fix nitrogen for spring plantings, and provide a break in […]


High Tunnels- Training Tomatoes

At Cloud Mountain Farm Center, we grow about a thousand tomato plants each year in our high tunnels. All of the varieties we grow are indeterminate varieties, meaning they are varieties that continue to grow and produce over a long season, rather than setting all of the tomatoes at once. Because of our cool summers […]

Salad Greens Production
Salad Greens Production

by Matthew McDermott, production manager, and Rob Jordan, post harvest manager For many people, mixed baby greens are a popular salad choice all year round.  As part of the CMFC food production, mixed baby greens are grown for the local wholesale and retail outlets from May-November. As part of a 2012 specialty crop grant, and […]

Spring Soil Preparation
Spring Soil Preparation

These last weeks of March, as winter begins to loosen its heavy grip, many of us get excited to get early ground turned in preparation for peas, oats, and anything else we thing we might get to survive the remaining spring awakening in the still cold, 42°F soils. There are a lot of tools and […]

Peppers! By Celeste Monke
Peppers! By Celeste Monke

‘Tis the season. Temperatures are high and the hothouse fruits are fruiting. This furry fellow still has some days to go, but should turn into a spicy 2” beast with a heat level somewhere between Serranos and Cayenne. A furry pepper you ask? Yes. It’s a Rocoto pepper, from the Andean highlands species Capsicum pubescens […]